The Rapture

Consider the following quote from Dr. Ed Hindson:

“If you disagree on the timing of the rapture, please don’t tell people, ‘There’s never going to be a rapture.’ No, there must be a rapture, or the Bible is not true. There must be a time when the archangel shouts, when the trumpet sounds, and the dead in Christ are raised, and the living are caught up (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18). We may differ on the timing of the rapture but not the fact of the rapture.” [i]

[i] Ed Hindson, Future Glory (Eugene, Oregon: Harvest House Publishers, 2021), p. 14.

Kushner in Knesset: We all have a role in advancing Abraham Accords

stIsrael News

Jerusalem Post

Jared Kushner spoke at an event in honor of the one-year anniversary of the peace and normalization agreements between Israel and Arab states.

By LAHAV HARKOV   OCTOBER 11, 2021 21:09

   

White House Senior Adviser Jared Kushner during a visit with Israeli delegation to Rabat, Morocco (photo credit: US EMBASSY IN MOROCCO/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS)

White House Senior Adviser Jared Kushner during a visit with Israeli delegation to Rabat, Morocco(photo credit: US EMBASSY IN MOROCCO/HANDOUT VIA REUTERS)

It is time to act to ensure the Abraham Accords fulfill their potential, Jared Kushner, former senior adviser to US president Donald Trump, said Monday at a ceremony in the Knesset.

“What we created is a new paradigm in the region,” he said. “It can have many different outcomes. It is imperative on all of us to set high expectations for what we want the Abraham Accords to achieve.

”Kushner, who founded the Abraham Accords Institute for Peace, spoke at an event in honor of the one-year anniversary of the peace and normalization agreements between Israel and Arab states. His wife, Ivanka Trump, attended as well.

The Knesset Abraham Accords Caucus, which includes 107 MKs and is led by Ofir Akunis (Likud) and Ruth Wasserman Lande (Blue and White), hosted the event. Kushner recalled that the announcement of peace between Israel and the United Arab Emirates “shocked everyone.” He quipped that it was “one of the few things between Israel and the US that didn’t leak out.”

Kushner said when he, together with the first Israeli delegation, arrived in Abu Dhabi on a direct flight, “the image captured the imaginations of the whole region. People realized things were just different.” Now, Israel is more popular in Arab states than he had imagined, Kushner said.

“Muslims in Indonesia, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Pakistani are seeing that Israel is not what they thought it is,” he said. “They are seeing that Israel is welcoming their Muslim brothers. A new era has really begun.”

War & Peace

If you want to see the English subtitles, click on CC and choose English.

This song broke my heart.

We don’t want these scenes to happen in reality. Prayer is needed for all those who are in these horrible situations.

And LOVE!

Jerusalem

Jerusalem is one of the world’s oldest cities. Dominion over Jerusalem has changed hands dozens of times and the city, along with the Holy Temple, was destroyed twice – once in 586 BCE by Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon and again in 70 CE by Rome.

From 70 CE until 1948, Jerusalem was controlled by a series of empires. In modern history, dominion over Jerusalem was held by the Ottoman Empire from 1516 until the beginning of the British Mandate in 1917.

On November 29, 1947, the UN General Assembly approved the Partition Plan, granting the Jewish people dominion over part of Jerusalem for the first time in 2,000 years. There is a street in Jerusalem known as Kaf-Tet B’November, which literally means November 29, honoring this momentous date.

Jerusalem was reunited, and the Old City was restored to Jewish hands, in June 1967, as an outcome of the Six Day War. Israel celebrates this reunification on Yom Yerushalayim  (Jerusalem Day) each year on 28 Iyar in the Hebrew calendar (May-June).

Jerusalem is the capital city of the State of Israel with more than nine million residents. Of those, 64% are Jewish, 34% are Muslim and 2% are Christian.

Jerusalem, and more specifically the Temple Mount, is destined to be the home of the Third and Eternal Holy Temple.

Much of today’s news regarding Jerusalem can be understood in light of these two verses from Zechariah:

Behold, I will make Yerushalayim a bowl of reeling for the peoples all around. Yehuda shall be caught up in the siege upon Yerushalayim, when all the nations of the earth gather against her. In that day, I will make Yerushalayim a stone for all the peoples to lift; all who lift it shall injure themselves. (Zechariah 12:2-3)

A bowl of reeling is more clearly understood as a cup of poison.  Just as Zechariah prophesied, Jerusalem is a cup of poison and a burdensome stone; it is a political headache for much of the world. Yet, it is precisely the epicenter for those nations who love God, love Jerusalem and have honored it in recent years.

Today, Jerusalem is in the news on a daily basis. In 2018, President Trump moved the US Embassy to Jerusalem and other countries are following suit. The Palestinian government claims it will break ties with any country who does so and many countries have succumbed to this pressure and have taken a strong stance against Jewish sovereignty over Jerusalem.

There are incredible archaeology discoveries unearthed in Jerusalem on a regular basis that prove the city was the ancient capital of Israel.

The prophet Isaiah taught that Jerusalem will be a house of prayer for all nations.

I will bring them to My sacred mount And let them rejoice in My house of prayer. Their burnt offerings and sacrifices Shall be welcome on My mizbayach; For My House shall be called A house of prayer for all peoples.” (Isaiah 56:7)

In partial fulfillment of that prophecy, the Jewish State has welcomed Christian visitors to the holy city. Each year on the Feast of Tabernacles, thousands of pilgrims from all around the world head to Jerusalem.

Our feet stood inside your gates, O YerushalayimYerushalayim built up, a city knit together,  to which tribes would make pilgrimage, the tribes of Hashem, —as was enjoined upon Yisrael— to praise the name of Hashem. There the thrones of judgment stood, thrones of the house of David. Pray for the well-being of Yerushalayim; “May those who love you be at peace. (Psalms 122: 2-6)

Jerusalem is referred to over 600 times in the Hebrew Bible.

There is a Jewish teaching that Jerusalem, called Yerushalayim in Hebrew, has 70 names. Zion and Moriah are two commonly used alternative names. Yerushalayim is a combination of yireh, the Hebrew word that means “he will see” and Shalem, the city associated with King Melchizedek.

And King Melchizedek of Shalem brought out bread and wine; he was a priest of Hashem Most High. (Genesis 14:18)

Ancient Jerusalem was once called Jebus and was inhabited by the Jebusites, as this verse in the Book of Judges illustrates.

But the man refused to stay for the night. He set out and traveled as far as the vicinity of Jebus—that is, Yerushalayim; he had with him a pair of laden donkeys, and his concubine was with him. (Judges 19:10)

JERUSALEM IN PROPHECY

While many of the prophecies about Jerusalem being rebuilt have started to be fulfilled in recent decades, the final end days vision for Jerusalem is just on the horizon.

Isaiah’s prophecy that the timeless messages of the Torah will come forth from Jerusalem, is starting to happen.

And the many peoples shall go and say: “Come, Let us go up to the Mount of Hashem, To the House of the God of Yaakov; That He may instruct us in His ways, And that we may walk in His paths.” For instruction shall come forth from Tzion, The word of Hashem from Yerushalayim. (Isaiah 2:3)

The Bible says the Third Temple will be built in Jerusalem.

He brought me, in visions of Hashem, to the Land of Yisrael, and He set me down on a very high mountain on which there seemed to be the outline of a city on the south. (Ezekiel 40:2)

The prophet Zechariah taught that Moshiach (Messiah) will enter Jerusalem on a donkey.

Rejoice greatly, Fair Tzion; Raise a shout, Fair Yerushalayim! Lo, your king is coming to you. He is victorious, triumphant, Yet humble, riding on an ass, On a donkey foaled by a she-ass. (Zechariah 9:9)

Jerusalem is indeed a city like no other, with an unparalleled Biblical past, a vibrant present and a glorious future.

Vital Statistics: Latest statistics for Israel – 2020 – 2022

Independence Day is the national day of Israel, commemorating the Israeli Declaration of Independence in 1948. The day is marked by official and unofficial ceremonies and observances. Because Israel declared independence on 14 May 1948, which corresponded with the Hebrew date 5 Iyar in that year, Yom Ha’atzmaut was originally celebrated on that date. en.wikipedia.org

On Israeli Independence Day 2021, Israel’s population stood at 9,327,000. This is a more than 10-fold increase compared to when Israel was founded in 1948. The population increased by 1.5% since last Independence Day. The Jewish population is 6,894,000 (73.9%) and 1,966,000 (21.1%) are Arabs.


Diversity & Growth

Immigration & Naturalization
A Young Population
Distribution
Birth, Marriage & Divorce

Diversity & Growth

The population increased by 1.5% since last Indendence Day. The Jewish population is 6,894,000 (73.9%) and 1,966,000 (21.1%) are Arabs. Those identified as “others” (non-Arab ChristiansBaha’i, Samaritans, Karaite Jews, Seventh-day Adventists, Messianic Jews, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and immigrants from the former Soviet Union, who identify themselves as Jewish but do not satisfy the Orthodox Jewish definition of “Jewish” the government uses for civil procedures) make up 5% of the population (467,000 people).

In 2020, the population by religion was roughly 18% Muslim (2019 – 1,636,000), 2% (180,000) Christian and 2% Druze.

When the state was established, there were only 806,000 residents and the total population reached its first and second millions in 1949 and 1958 respectively. Judging by current population trend data, experts predict that the population of Israel will reach 10 million by 2024 or sooner.

In addition to these numbers, there are approximately 170,000 people living in Israel who are neither citizens nor permanent residents. 

Out of the 14.7 million Jewish people in the world, 47% reside in Israel.  

The average earnings per household are NIS 20,027 gross (approximately $5,800).

Approximately 50,000 people died in 2020, with more than 3,300 succumbing to COVID-19.

Israel is the 100th most populous country in the world, not including the over 250,000 illegal foreign workers and African migrants residing in Israel.

Of Israeli Jews over age 20 in 2020, 43% self-identify as secular, 22% as traditional but not very religious, 13% as traditional-religious, 11% as religious and 10% as ultra-Orthodox.

According to a poll by the NGO Hiddush published in September 2019, 58% of Jewish citizens do not affiliate with any religious stream, 18% are “Zionist Orthodox,” 12% “ultra-Orthodox” (including 2% “Zionist ultra-Orthodox”), 7% “Reform,” and 6% “Conservative.”

Ultra-Orthodox Jews As Percentage of Population
(thousands)
 200920142020
 Number% of TotalNumber% of TotalNumber% of Total
Ultra-Orthodox75010%91111%1,17513%
Other Jews5,26770%5,56068%5,69561%
Arab Israelis1,53620%1,71321%1,95621%
       
Total7,553 8,184 8,826 
Note: Total does not include non-Arabs. Percentages for 2020 are of total Israeli population including non-Arabs.
Source: Israel Democracy Institute 

https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/latest-population-statistics-for-israel

(January 2022)

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Vital Statistics:Table of Contents|Annual Statistical Glimpse|Immigration Statistics

At the end of 2021, Israel’s population stood at 9,450,000.  This is a more than 10-fold increase compared to when Israel was founded in 1948.  

Diversity & Growth
Immigration & Naturalization
A Young Population
Distribution
Birth, Marriage & Divorce

Diversity & Growth

The population increased by 1.7% in 2021. The Jewish population is 6,998,000 (73.9%) and 1,995,000 (21.1%) are Arabs. Those identified as “others” (non-Arab ChristiansBaha’i, Samaritans, Karaite Jews, Seventh-day Adventists, Messianic Jews, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and immigrants from the former Soviet Union, who identify themselves as Jewish but do not satisfy the Orthodox Jewish definition of “Jewish” the government uses for civil procedures) make up 5% of the population (472,000 people).

In 2020, the population by religion was roughly 18% Muslim (2019 – 1,636,000), 2% (180,000) Christian and 2% Druze.

When the state was established, there were only 806,000 residents and the total population reached its first and second millions in 1949 and 1958 respectively. Judging by current population trend data, experts predict that the population of Israel will reach 10 million by 2024 or sooner.

In addition to these numbers, there are approximately 170,000 people living in Israel who are neither citizens nor permanent residents. 

Out of the 15.2 million Jewish people in the world, 46% reside in Israel.  

The average earnings per household are NIS 20,027 gross (approximately $5,800).

The number of deaths in 2021 – 51,000 – was higher than previous years, and even higher than 2020, when 47,788 Israelis died amid the COVID-19 outbreak. In 2021, more than 4,800 Israelis succumbed to COVID-19.

Israel is the 100th most populous country in the world, not including the over 250,000 illegal foreign workers and African migrants residing in Israel.

Of Israeli Jews over age 20 in 2020, 43% self-identify as secular, 22% as traditional but not very religious, 13% as traditional-religious, 11% as religious and 10% as ultra-Orthodox.

According to a poll by the NGO Hiddush published in September 2019, 58% of Jewish citizens do not affiliate with any religious stream, 18% are “Zionist Orthodox,” 12% “ultra-Orthodox” (including 2% “Zionist ultra-Orthodox”), 7% “Reform,” and 6% “Conservative.”

Ultra-Orthodox Jews As Percentage of Population
(thousands)
 200920142020
 Number% of TotalNumber% of TotalNumber% of Total
Ultra-Orthodox75010%91111%1,17513%
Other Jews5,26770%5,56068%5,69561%
Arab Israelis1,53620%1,71321%1,95621%
       
Total7,553 8,184 8,826 
Note: Total does not include non-Arabs. Percentages for 2020 are of total Israeli population including non-Arabs.
Source: Israel Democracy Institute 

 

According to 2019 figures, more than three-quarters (77.5%) of Christians are Arabs, representing 7.2% of all Israeli-Arab citizens. The majority of non-Arab Christians living in Israel are citizens who immigrated to Israel since 1990, together with Jewish family members under the Law of Return.

Some 70.6% of Arab-Christians live in northern Israel today, while 13.3% reside in the coastal city of Haifa and 9.5% live in Jerusalem. The nation’s most populous Christian cities are Nazareth (21,900 inhabitants), Haifa (16,100), Jerusalem (12,700) and the Galilee city of Shfaram (10,300).

The average fertility rate among Christians in 2018 was 2.06 children per woman, compared to 3.2 for Muslim women, 3.17 for Jewish women and 2.16 for Druze women.

Immigration & Naturalization

Israel welcomed approximately 25,000 new immigrants during 2021, an incease of 29% from 2020. Most immigrants arrived in Israel from Russia (30%), France (15%), the United States (14%), and Ukraine (12%).

Since Israel’s founding, 3.3 million people have immigrated to the country, 45% of them arriving since 1990.

“Most of the immigrants coming to Israel from Russia and Ukraine in recent years do not qualify as Jewish under religious law, even if they are eligible for citizenship,” Judy Maltz noted, “To qualify for citizenship under the Law of Return, an individual must have at least one Jewish grandparent, a Jewish spouse or have undergone a conversion in a recognized Jewish community (it does not have to be an Orthodox conversion). To qualify as a Jew under religious law, an individual must have been born to a Jewish mother or have undergone an Orthodox conversion by rabbis recognized by Israel’s Chief Rabbinate.”

Rising anti-Semitism in France likely accounts for the increase in immigrants from that country. Maltz noted that many French Jews who moved to Israel returned to France because of difficulty integrating into Israeli society due to the inability to master Hebrew and find jobs matching their skills.

In 2020, 78% of the total Jewish population were “Sabras” – born in Israel – compared with just a 35% native-born population at Israel’s independence in 1948. Over half of the Jewish population are Israeli-born to at least one parent who was also Israeli-born.2Those of European and American ancestry ma030ke up about 2.2 million (36%) of the Jewish population in Israel while Africans fill out another 14.5% and Asians are 11.2%.

A study performed by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life found that one in four Jewish individuals currently live in a country other than the one they were born in. In contrast, one in twenty Christians and one in twenty-five Muslims live in a country other than that of their birth. This makes Jewish individuals the world’s top migrants.

A Young Population

Israel’s population is considered young relative to the populations of other Western countries.

As of 2021, 28% of the population was aged 0-14 while only 12% were older than 65 years of age. The OECD average is 18.5% (0-14) and 15% (65+). Israel’s average age, however, is getting older. In 2011, the average age was 29.5 years as opposed to 27.6 in the year 2000. Average age worldwide for males is 28.4 and for women is 30.6 years old.

Life expectancy for Israelis is 83 years, 81 years for men, and 84.7 years for women. In 2017, life expectancy for Arab women was 79.5 years and 77.4 for men.

The World Health Organization issued a report in May 2016 that concluded humans were on average living 5 years longer than they were in 2000. Israel was ranked as the country with the 8th highest life expectancy in the world, better than the United States, Canada, France, Russia, and other highly developed nations. Life expectancy in 2020 was 83.5 years for all Israelis, 84.9 for women and 82 for men.

Distribution

Israel’s population density in 2017 was reported as 373.2 people per km2. By comparison, Slovenia (who’s territory is roughly the same size as Israel’s) has a population density of 102 people per km2Belgium (slightly larger than Israel) has a density of 364 people per km2.

Tel Aviv is Israel’s densest region with 7,522 people per km2Jerusalem has a density of 1,484 people per km2 and Bnei Brak is Israel’s densest city with 22,145 people per km2.

The most popular cities for new immigrants to settle down in during 2014 were Tel Aviv and Netanya, with 3,275, and 3,102 new immigrants settling there, respectively.

Just under half of the Jewish population lives in the center of the country, either Jerusalem or Tel Aviv metropolitan areas. 60% of the Arab population lives in the north.

Jerusalem is Israel’s largest city, with a population of 936,047, followed by Tel Aviv-Jaffa (461,352), Haifa (285,542), Rishon Le-Zion (254,238) and Petah Tikva (248,005). Today there are 14 cities in Israel with a population of over 100,000.

Israel’s male to female population ratio is 982:1,000.

Israel has 15 cities that are home to over 100,000 people.

Birth, Marriage & Divorce

The average age for an Israeli woman to be married in 2016 was 26.1 years old, and the average age for an Israeli woman to have her first child was 28.3. Teen births are uncommon in Israel, with births to women aged 19 and under accounting for 0.5% of national births during 2016.

The fertility of Israeli Jewish women in 2018 exceeded that of Arab women for the first time. The rate among Jewish women living in Israel and in Israeli settlement in the West Bank was 3.05 compared to 3.04 for Israeli Arab women. The overall fertility rate in Israel in 2020 was 3.01 children per woman. The average fertility rate for 2017 for all developed countries of the OECD was 1.65.

Some 184,000 babies were born in 2021 (74 born to Jewish mothers, 23% to Arab mothers and 3% to mothers of others).


SourcesIsrael Central Bureau of Statistics.
Maytal Yasur Beit-Or.  Israel boasts highest fertility rate among OECD nations, Israel Hayom, (November 13, 2017).
Amir Alon.  Nearing nine million: Israel in numbers on eve of 2018, YNet News (December 31, 2017).
Ofer Aderet.  Israel.s Population Near Nine Million on Eve of 70th Independence Anniversary, Haaretz, (April 16, 2018).
Ilan Lazarovich, As new year approaches, Israelis say they are happy, healthy, Israel Hayom, (September 5, 2018).
“Israel.s population 8.972m on eve of 2019,” Globus, (December 31, 2018).
Judy Maltz, “Number of Russians Moving to Israel Sees Dramatic Rise, American Aliyah Figures Drop,” Haaretz, (December 27, 2018).
Zeev Klein, “Israel reaches another milestone as population crosses 9 million,” Israel Hayom, (May 2, 2019).
“Israel.s population tops 9 million as Jewish new year approaches,” Times of Israel, (September 26, 2019).
Maayan Jaffe-Hoffman, “Number Of Jews In Israel And Worldwide On The Rise – Reports,” Jerusalem Post, (September 27, 2019).
Ronny Linder, “New Report Shows Significant Discrepancy in Life Expectancy Between Israeli Cities,” Haaretz, (December 5, 2019).
Eytan Halon, “Israel.s Christian population grows to 177,000 citizens,” Jerusalem Post, (December 23, 2019).
“Israel.s population at 9,136,000 on the eve of 2020,” Jerusalem Post, (January 1, 2020).
Ofer Aderet, “For the First Time in Israel.s History, Jewish Fertility Rate Surpasses That of Arabs,” Haaretz, (December 31, 2019).
Worldometer.
“Ahead of 72nd Independence Day, Israeli population stands at 9.2 million,” Times of Israel, (April 26, 2020).
“Israel.s population up to 9.25 million, though growth rate, immigration down,” Times of Israel, (September 16, 2020).
U.S. State Department.
Moshe Cohen, “Jewish population at lowest percentage since founding of Israel,” Jerusalem Post, (April 12, 2021).
Ofer Aderet, “On Jewish New Year’s Eve, Israel’s Population Reaches 9.4 Million,” Haaretz, (September 5, 2021).
“Israel’s population at nearly 9.5 million as it enters 2022,” Jerusalem Post, (December 30, 2021).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

According to 2019 figures, more than three-quarters (77.5%) of Christians are Arabs, representing 7.2% of all Israeli-Arab citizens. The majority of non-Arab Christians living in Israel are citizens who immigrated to Israel since 1990, together with Jewish family members under the Law of Return.

Some 70.6% of Arab-Christians live in northern Israel today, while 13.3% reside in the coastal city of Haifa and 9.5% live in Jerusalem. The nation’s most populous Christian cities are Nazareth (21,900 inhabitants), Haifa (16,100), Jerusalem (12,700) and the Galilee city of Shfaram (10,300).

The average fertility rate among Christians in 2018 was 2.06 children per woman, compared to 3.2 for Muslim women, 3.17 for Jewish women and 2.16 for Druze women.

Immigration & Naturalization

Israel welcomed approximately 20,000 new immigrants during 2020, down significantly from the 34,000 last year undoubtedly because of the coronavirus pandemic. Most immigrants arrived in Israel from Russia (38.1%), Ukraine (15.1%), France (11.0%), and the United States (10.7%).

Since Israel’s founding, 3.3 million people have immigrated to the country, 44% of them arriving since 1990.

While the number of immigrants from most countries declined, those from Russia increased significantly. “Most of the immigrants coming to Israel from Russia and Ukraine in recent years do not qualify as Jewish under religious law, even if they are eligible for citizenship,” Judy Maltz noted, “To qualify for citizenship under the Law of Return, an individual must have at least one Jewish grandparent, a Jewish spouse or have undergone a conversion in a recognized Jewish community (it does not have to be an Orthodox conversion). To qualify as a Jew under religious law, an individual must have been born to a Jewish mother or have undergone an Orthodox conversion by rabbis recognized by Israel’s Chief Rabbinate.”

Another significant change in 2018 was a surprising reduction in the number of immigrants from France despite rising anti-Semitism in that country. Moreover, Maltz reported that many French Jews who moved to Israel have returned to France because of difficulty integrating into Israeli society due to the inability to master Hebrew and find jobs matching their skills.

In 2020, 78% of the total Jewish population were “Sabras” – born in Israel – compared with just a 35% native-born population at Israel’s independence in 1948. Over half of the Jewish population are Israeli-born to at least one parent who was also Israeli-born.2Those of European and American ancestry ma030ke up about 2.2 million (36%) of the Jewish population in Israel while Africans fill out another 14.5% and Asians are 11.2%.

A study performed by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life found that one in four Jewish individuals currently live in a country other than the one they were born in. In contrast, one in twenty Christians and one in twenty-five Muslims live in a country other than that of their birth. This makes Jewish individuals the world’s top migrants.

A Young Population

Israel’s population is considered young relative to the populations of other Western countries.

As of 2021, 28% of the population was aged 0-14 while only 12% were older than 65 years of age. The OECD average is 18.5% (0-14) and 15% (65+). Israel’s average age, however, is getting older. In 2011, the average age was 29.5 years as opposed to 27.6 in the year 2000. Average age worldwide for males is 28.4 and for women is 30.6 years old.

Life expectancy for Israelis is 83 years, 81 years for men, and 84.7 years for women. In 2017, life expectancy for Arab women was 79.5 years and 77.4 for men.

The World Health Organization issued a report in May 2016 that concluded humans were on average living 5 years longer than they were in 2000. Israel was ranked as the country with the 8th highest life expectancy in the world, better than the United States, Canada, France, Russia, and other highly developed nations. Life expectancy in 2020 was 83.5 years for all Israelis, 84.9 for women and 82 for men.

Distribution

Israel’s population density in 2017 was reported as 373.2 people per km2. By comparison, Slovenia (who’s territory is roughly the same size as Israel’s) has a population density of 102 people per km2Belgium (slightly larger than Israel) has a density of 364 people per km2.

Tel Aviv is Israel’s densest region with 7,522 people per km2Jerusalem has a density of 1,484 people per km2 and Bnei Brak is Israel’s densest city with 22,145 people per km2.

The most popular cities for new immigrants to settle down in during 2014 were Tel Aviv and Netanya, with 3,275, and 3,102 new immigrants settling there, respectively.

Just under half of the Jewish population lives in the center of the country, either Jerusalem or Tel Aviv metropolitan areas. 60% of the Arab population lives in the north.

Jerusalem is Israel’s largest city, with a population of 936,047, followed by Tel Aviv-Jaffa (461,352), Haifa (285,542), Rishon Le-Zion (254,238) and Petah Tikva (248,005). Today there are 14 cities in Israel with a population of over 100,000.

Israel’s male to female population ratio is 982:1,000.

Israel has 15 cities that are home to over 100,000 people.

Birth, Marriage & Divorce

The average age for an Israeli woman to be married in 2016 was 26.1 years old, and the average age for an Israeli woman to have her first child was 28.3. Teen births are uncommon in Israel, with births to women aged 19 and under accounting for 0.5% of national births during 2016.

The fertility of Israeli Jewish women in 2018 exceeded that of Arab women for the first time. The rate among Jewish women living in Israel and in Israeli settlement in the West Bank was 3.05 compared to 3.04 for Israeli Arab women. The overall fertility rate in Israel in 2020 was 3.01 children per woman. The average fertility rate for 2017 for all developed countries of the OECD was 1.65.

Some 176,000 babies were born in 2020 (73.8% born to Jewish mothers, 23.4% to Arab mothers and 2.8% to mothers of Others).


SourcesIsrael Central Bureau of Statistics.
Maytal Yasur Beit-Or.  Israel boasts highest fertility rate among OECD nations, Israel Hayom, (November 13, 2017).
Amir Alon.  Nearing nine million: Israel in numbers on eve of 2018, YNet News (December 31, 2017).
Ofer Aderet.  Israel.s Population Near Nine Million on Eve of 70th Independence Anniversary, Haaretz, (April 16, 2018).
Ilan Lazarovich, As new year approaches, Israelis say they are happy, healthy, Israel Hayom, (September 5, 2018).
“Israel.s population 8.972m on eve of 2019,” Globus, (December 31, 2018).
Judy Maltz, “Number of Russians Moving to Israel Sees Dramatic Rise, American Aliyah Figures Drop,” Haaretz, (December 27, 2018).
Zeev Klein, “Israel reaches another milestone as population crosses 9 million,” Israel Hayom, (May 2, 2019).
“Israel.s population tops 9 million as Jewish new year approaches,” Times of Israel, (September 26, 2019).
Maayan Jaffe-Hoffman, “Number Of Jews In Israel And Worldwide On The Rise – Reports,” Jerusalem Post, (September 27, 2019).
Ronny Linder, “New Report Shows Significant Discrepancy in Life Expectancy Between Israeli Cities,” Haaretz, (December 5, 2019).
Eytan Halon, “Israel.s Christian population grows to 177,000 citizens,” Jerusalem Post, (December 23, 2019).
“Israel.s population at 9,136,000 on the eve of 2020,” Jerusalem Post, (January 1, 2020).
Ofer Aderet, “For the First Time in Israel.s History, Jewish Fertility Rate Surpasses That of Arabs,” Haaretz, (December 31, 2019).
Worldometer.
“Ahead of 72nd Independence Day, Israeli population stands at 9.2 million,” Times of Israel, (April 26, 2020).
“Israel.s population up to 9.25 million, though growth rate, immigration down,” Times of Israel, (September 16, 2020).
U.S. State Department.
Moshe Cohen, “Jewish population at lowest percentage since founding of Israel,” Jerusalem Post, (April 12, 2021).

The Year of the Red Heifer

“I really believe that the red heifer was born this year,” Kupietzy said. He explained that the current Hebrew year is 5781 which, in Hebrew numerology, is תשפא. “That is an acronym for תהיה שנה פרה אדומה (it will be the year of the red heifer).”

Kupietzky explained that as part of the ongoing effort to find a red heifer, he is working with Boneh Israel (build Israel), a Christian organization, to educate non-Jews to identify possible candidates. Kupietzky explained that the Talmud has a precedent for the red heifer being provided by a non-Jew. The Talmud (Kiddushin 31a) tells the story of the non-Jew named Dama who would not wake his father, Netina, to get to the key under his pillow to retrieve the stones to sell for the breastplate of the High Priest at a price of 600,000 dinarsDama forfeited this great sum simply so as not to disturb his father’s sleep. He was rewarded the following year by finding in his flock and selling a rare red heifer to the rabbis for the same sum.

“The red heifer is not a korban, a sacrifice,” Kupietzky pointed out. “It is performed outside of the Temple and is considered a tekes, a ceremony. Which is why we are especially looking in Texas for the tekes,” he quipped.

The existence of such a heifer is considered a biological anomaly and very rare. Fortunately, the ritual requires an infinitesimally small quantity of ashes. From the time of Moses, who personally prepared the first heifer, until the destruction of the Temple, only nine red heifers were prepared. Nonetheless, this was sufficient to maintain the ritual purity of the entire nation for almost 2,000 years.

According to Jewish tradition, there will only be ten red heifers in human history with the tenth heifer ushering in the Messianic era. Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon (Maimonides), the most renowned medieval Jewish scholar known by the acronym Rambam, wrote in his explanation of the mitzvah that “the tenth red heifer will be accomplished by the king, the Messiah; may he be revealed speedily, Amen, May it be God’s will.”

Third Temple Closer Than Ever As Search Begins for Eligible Jewish Priests


BY ADAM ELIYAHU BERKOWITZ | MAR 30, 2016 | JEWISH WORLD

Kohanim blowing silver trumpets in a reenactment of a Temple service. (Photo: The Temple Institute)Share this article

The Temple Institute has initiated the second stage towards building the Temple: compiling a list of Jewish priests who will be eligible to prepare the red heifer and serve in the Temple, Rabbi Chaim Richman, the International Director of the Temple Institute, announced on Monday. The announcement coincides with the weekly Torah reading that describes the preparation of the red heifer.

The registry will include men who have a clear patriarchal heritage from the priestly class (descendants of Aaron), were born and raised in Israel, and have observed the laws of purity incumbent upon priests. This includes not coming into proximity with the dead, so priests, or kohanim, who were born in hospitals, have visited hospitals, or have entered cemeteries are not eligible.

.Rabbi Chaim Richman. (Photo: The Temple Institute)

Rabbi Chaim Richman. (Photo: The Temple Institute)

Once the Temple Institute has compiled a list of candidates with verified eligibility, it will begin to train them in the complex preparation of the ashes of the red heifer. The training will take place at the Nezer Hakodesh, an institute established three years ago to educate priests in the details of the Temple service.

The project has implications not just for kohanim, but for anyone interested in taking part in the Temple service. Anyone going up to the Temple needs to be on a high level of ritual purity.  Most types of impurity can be removed through immersion in a mikveh (a ritual bath). For ritual impurity imparted through contact or proximity to a dead person, the purification process  requires a priest to sprinkle water mixed with the ashes of a red heifer.

Today, after thousands of years without a Temple, all people are considered to be on this level of impurity, making the reinstituting of the red heifer ashes an essential part of the return of the Temple service.

“This is a huge jump for the Temple Institute and a huge leap for the Jewish people. For the first time in 2,000 years, after miraculously returning to the Land of Israel, we are beginning the process of reinstating the Biblical purity of the Jewish priesthood,” Rabbi Richman told JNI.  

“This is another bold move for our Institute, having already painstakingly prepared more than 60 sacred vessels for the Third Temple. We proudly call upon all those who may fit the bill to contact the Temple Institute immediately.”

The Temple Institute is a non-profit organization, founded in 1987, which is dedicated to rebuilding the Jewish Temple on Mount Moriah in Jerusalem. Much of its work has been in the areas of education and raising awareness, but it has also made remarkable practical achievements towards turning the Third Temple into a reality.

It has recreated over 70 utensils fit for the Temple service, including the gold menorah, the gem encrusted breastplate of the high priest, musical instruments used by the Levites, and priestly garments.

.Illustrative photo of red heifer in Israel. (Photo: Tazpit News Agency)

Illustrative photo of red heifer in Israel. (Photo: Tazpit News Agency)

Perhaps its most amazing achievement to date has been the red heifer. After decades of research in how to practically restore the Temple, Temple Institute scholars realized that the first step in the seemingly impossible task was raising a red heifer. Frozen embryos of red angus cattle were implanted in Israeli cattle, introducing the breed to Israel.

Biblical law requires that the red heifer be unblemished, and it is forbidden from being milked or impregnated, so must be raised in special supervised conditions.

Unlike most other aspects of the Temple service, burning of the red heifer and the use of its ashes to purify do not require ascending to the Temple Mount. This precludes any political complications that may arise, since Jews are currently prevented from praying or performing any rituals at the holy site.

The Key to Daniel’s 70th Week Revealed

I’ve studied prophecy since I was 12 years old, so to find something NEW is very exciting. This video is a fresh and distinct approach. I, personally, am unable to verify the calculations that are revealed here, but they are sufficiently presented in continuity to certainly give pause and reflection to them.

(NOTE) Jesus as the teacher, had the best interests of His students at heart; always, the subject of His teaching was the absolute and unchanging truth of God. We also have the best interests of our readers at heart. However, as we seek to share, we do not claim that we are qualified to be called teachers per se.

Having been given the gift of the desire to teach, doesn’t qualify us to state that we are teaching the absolute and unchanging truth of God. It is our hope, and intention, however, to be as accurate as humanly possible being led by discernment from the Holy Spirit.

Always keep in mind, Jesus’s teaching was the only absolute and unchanging truth of God. Neither we, nor any other human, has the absolute truth.

 

Love your enemies

This message makes me stop and think.

Do I really love my enemies?

And better yet, who are my enemies?

Do I really have any?

First of all, we are so blessed that we do not have to endure the kind of persecution referred to in this story. But if we did, what would be our attitude? our response?

On a routine day, how do we respond to our neighbors when they do something that displeases us?

Do we vent to them?

Take it out on them?

Are we passive aggressive?

Do we fuss and fume about it in our homes?

Do we love, instead?

Food for thought!

~ Sharon

But I tell you: Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you… Matthew 5:44

Perhaps the most difficult of Jesus’ commands is to love even our enemies. A true Christian always seeks another person’s highest good—even when mistreated. Brother Andrew says “The Christian’s only method of destroying his enemies is to ‘love’ them into being his friends.”

Romanian pastor, Dr. Paul Negrut, was visiting an old friend in Romania named Trian Dors in his humble home. As Paul entered, he realized that Trian was bleeding from open wounds. He asked, “What happened?”

Trian replied, “The secret police just left my home. They came and confiscated my manuscripts. Then they beat me.”

Pastor Paul says, “I began to complain about the heavy tactics of the secret police. But Trian stopped me saying, ‘Brother Paul, it is so sweet to suffer for Jesus. God didn’t bring us together tonight to complain but to praise him. Let’s kneel down and pray.”

“He knelt and began praying for the secret police. He asked God to bless them and save them. He told God how much he loved them. He said, ‘God, if they will come back in the next few days, I pray that you will prepare me to minister to them.’” Paul continued, “By this time I was ashamed. I thought I had been living the most difficult life in Romania for the Lord. And I was bitter about that.”

Trian Dors then shared with Paul how the secret police had been coming to his home regularly for several years. They beat him twice every week. They confiscated all his papers. After the beating he would talk to the officer in charge. Trian would look into his eyes and say, “Mister, I love you. And I want you to know that if our next meeting is before the judgement throne of God, you will not go to hell because I hate you but because you rejected love.” Trian would repeat these words after every beating.

Years later that officer came alone to his home one night. Trian prepared himself for another beating. But the officer spoke kindly and said, “Mr. Dors, the next time we meet will be before the judgement throne of God. I came tonight to apologize for what I did to you and to tell you that your love moved my heart. I have asked Christ to save me. But two days ago the doctor discovered that I have a very severe case of cancer and I have only a few weeks to live before I go to be with God. I came tonight to tell you that we will be together on the other side.”

RESPONSE: Today I will destroy my enemies only with love.

PRAYER: God give me Your kind of love for my enemies—so they too will love You.

Standing Strong Through The Storm (SSTS)
A daily devotional message by SSTS author Paul Estabrooks

© 2011 Open Doors International. Used by permission

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